What Is the Stock Market: How Does share Market Work?

stock market

A stock market is a marketplace where stocks (also known as shares or equities) of publicly traded companies are bought and sold. People purchase stocks with the expectation that the company will perform well, which will lead to an increase in the stock’s value and a profit for the shareholder. The stock market provides companies with a source of capital by allowing them to issue stocks and providing investors with the opportunity to buy ownership of the company. The performance of the stock market is often used as an indicator of the overall health of a country’s economy.

The history of the stock market can be traced back to the Amsterdam Stock Exchange in the 17th century, which was one of the first formal stock exchanges in the world. In the following centuries, stock exchanges were established in other cities including London, Paris, and New York. The NYSE (New York Stock Exchange) became the largest and most influential stock exchange in the world.

It’s important to note that the stock market as we know it today is a result of the evolution and development of financial markets over several centuries, with contributions from many individuals and institutions. The concept of a stock market, where ownership of a company is divided into shares and traded on a centralized exchange, has been refined and improved upon over the years, with the development of new technologies and financial instruments. The stock market is a collective creation and a result of the collaboration and innovation of many individuals and institutions over a long period of time.

How does the Stock Market Work?

share market

The stock market works by connecting buyers and sellers of stocks through a centralized exchange. When a company wants to raise capital, it can issue new stocks and sell them to the public. These stocks are then traded on a stock exchange, such as the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), NASDAQ, Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) or National Stock Exchange (NSE).

Investors can buy stocks through a brokerage firm, which acts as an intermediary between the buyer and the stock exchange. When an investor places an order to buy a stock, the brokerage firm matches the order with a seller. The price of the stock is determined by supply and demand, with the price increasing as demand for the stock rises and decreasing as demand falls.

Once an investor owns a stock, they have partial ownership of the company and are entitled to a portion of the company’s profits and assets. The value of the stock can fluctuate based on various factors, including the company’s financial performance, economic conditions, and changes in the overall stock market.

Purpose of Stock Market

The purpose of the stock market is to provide a platform for the buying and selling of stocks and other securities, with the goal of facilitating the flow of capital from investors to companies. The stock market has several key functions, including:

  1. Raising capital for companies: Companies can raise funds by issuing stocks and selling them to investors in the stock market. This allows companies to grow and expand their operations.
  2. Providing investment opportunities: The stock market provides individuals and institutions with opportunities to invest their money and potentially earn a return on their investment.
  3. Determining the fair value of a company: The stock market helps determine the fair value of a company by enabling buyers and sellers to trade shares and reach a consensus on the price.
  4. Providing liquidity: The stock market makes it possible for investors to easily buy and sell stocks, providing them with greater flexibility and control over their investments.
  5. Promoting economic growth: By providing capital to companies and enabling investment, the stock market helps drive economic growth by supporting the development and expansion of businesses.
  6. Facilitating savings and investment: The stock market provides a way for individuals to save and invest their money, which can help them achieve their financial goals and secure their financial future.
  7. Encouraging transparency and accountability: By requiring companies to publicly disclose financial information, the stock market promotes transparency and accountability, helping to build trust and confidence among investors.
  8. Encouraging innovation and competition: Companies that go public and raise capital through the stock market are encouraged to innovate and compete, which can lead to the development of new products and services that benefit society.
  9. Providing a benchmark for other investments: The stock market provides a benchmark for the performance of other investments, such as bonds and real estate.
  10. Spurring economic development: By facilitating the flow of capital, the stock market can help spur economic development by providing companies with the resources they need to grow and create jobs.
  11. Enabling portfolio diversification: The stock market provides a way for investors to diversify their portfolios, reducing risk and increasing stability.
  12. Supporting pension funds and retirement savings: Many pension funds and retirement savings plans invest in the stock market, helping to ensure that people have adequate funds for their retirement.

Overall, the stock market serves as a crucial link between savers and companies, helping to allocate capital to its most productive use and promoting economic growth and development.

How Stock Market Crash?

Stock market crashes can happen due to a variety of factors, including:

  1. Economic Recessions: When the economy enters a period of decline, businesses and consumers cut back on spending, causing stock prices to fall.
  2. Interest Rate Hikes: If the Federal Reserve raises interest rates, the cost of borrowing money increases, causing businesses to reduce their investments, which can lead to a fall in stock prices.
  3. Political and Geopolitical Uncertainty: Political or geopolitical events such as wars, elections, or natural disasters can create uncertainty, causing investors to sell their stocks and leading to a market crash.
  4. Bankruptcies and Corporate Scandals: If a major company files for bankruptcy or is implicated in a scandal, its stock price can drop dramatically, affecting the entire market.
  5. Overvaluation: When stock prices become too high relative to earnings and other metrics, a correction is likely to occur.
  6. Market bubble: When the market experiences a rapid increase in valuations that are not backed by underlying fundamentals, it is referred to as a market bubble. When the bubble bursts, the market can experience a significant drop in prices.
  7. Sell-off panic: A sell-off panic occurs when a large number of investors simultaneously decide to sell their stocks, which can lead to a rapid decline in prices. This can be triggered by a variety of factors, including economic or political uncertainty, or even rumours or false information.
  8. Margin selling: When investors borrow money to purchase stocks, they are using margin. If the value of the stocks they have bought falls, they may be required to sell to cover the margin, which can lead to further declines in prices.
  9. Overreaction to news: Stock prices can sometimes overreact to news events, such as earnings reports or economic data releases. This can cause prices to decline quickly, even if the news is not as bad as investors initially perceived.
  10. Systematic risk: Systematic risk refers to the risk that affects the entire market and not just a single stock or sector. Examples of systematic risk include global recessions, pandemics, and natural disasters. When systematic risk increases, it can lead to a decline in the overall market.

These are just a few examples of the factors that can contribute to a stock market crash. It’s important to keep in mind that the stock market is complex and can be influenced by a variety of factors, both positive and negative.

Historical Stock Market Crashes

Here are some of the most notable stock market crashes in history:

1929 Wall Street Crash

The 1929 Wall Street Crash was a stock market crash that occurred on October 24, 1929, and lasted until November 13, 1929. It marked the beginning of the Great Depression, a severe economic downturn that lasted for nearly a decade.

The crash was caused by a combination of factors, including a period of economic speculation and overvaluation of stocks, a decline in consumer spending, and a decrease in international trade. The decline in the stock market led to a loss of confidence in the financial system, which in turn led to a decrease in borrowing and spending. This decline in economic activity contributed to the onset of the Great Depression.

The Wall Street Crash was a significant event in world history and had far-reaching consequences. It led to a decline in global trade and economic activity and contributed to the rise of anti-capitalist sentiment and political movements in many countries. The lessons learned from the 1929 crash have helped to inform and shape financial regulations and policies to reduce the likelihood of future stock market crashes.

Black Monday Crash

Black Monday was a stock market crash that occurred on October 19, 1987. On that day, the Dow Jones Industrial Average, a stock market index in the United States, fell by 22.61%, its largest one-day percentage decline in history. The crash was felt globally, with stock markets in many countries experiencing significant losses.

The causes of Black Monday are still not entirely clear, but several factors are believed to have contributed to the crash, including:

  1. Overvaluation: The stock market had been experiencing a period of strong growth in the years leading up to Black Monday, which led to the overvaluation of stocks.
  2. Computerized Trading: The use of computerized trading systems and high-frequency trading algorithms was becoming more widespread, and it’s believed that these systems exacerbated the decline in prices during the crash.
  3. Geopolitical Uncertainty: Tensions were high between the United States and the Soviet Union, and concerns over the possibility of a war in the Middle East were affecting market sentiment.
  4. Interest Rate Hikes: The Federal Reserve had been raising interest rates in an effort to slow down the economy, which increased the cost of borrowing and reduced the availability of credit.

The impact of Black Monday was felt globally, and the crash led to a significant decline in consumer confidence and economic activity. Despite the severity of the crash, the stock market recovered relatively quickly, and by the end of 1987, Dow Jones had regained much of its lost value. Nevertheless, Black Monday remains one of the most notable stock markets crashes in history and serves as a reminder of the importance of market regulation and stability.

2000 Dot-Com Bubble

The dot-com bubble was a period of excessive speculation and investment in internet-based companies that took place in the late 1990s and early 2000s. During this period, investors poured money into startups that promised to revolutionize the way we live and work, and the stock prices of many dot-com companies rose rapidly.

However, the bubble eventually burst as it became clear that many of these companies were not profitable and would not be able to fulfil their promises. In March 2000, the technology-heavy NASDAQ index peaked, and by 2002, many dot-com companies had gone bankrupt, and the NASDAQ had lost more than 75% of its value.

The causes of the dot-com bubble can be attributed to a variety of factors, including:

  1. Easy Access to Capital: During the late 1990s, it was relatively easy for startups to obtain venture capital funding, which fueled the growth of many dot-com companies.
  2. Speculation: Investors were lured by the promise of quick profits and were willing to invest in dot-com companies without a clear understanding of their business models or financial health.
  3. Hype: The media and analysts hyped the potential of the internet and the dot-com companies, leading to a general perception that these companies were unstoppable and would inevitably succeed.
  4. Lack of Regulation: The regulatory environment was relatively lax during the dot-com era, and there was a lack of transparency and accountability in the market, which contributed to the bubble.

The dot-com bubble was a cautionary tale about the dangers of speculation and irrational exuberance in the stock market. It also led to a tightening of financial regulations and a greater focus on the transparency and accountability of public companies.

2008 Global Financial Crisis

The 2008 global financial crisis was a major economic crisis that began in 2008 and lasted until 2009. The crisis was caused by the collapse of the US housing market, which had been fueled by subprime mortgage lending practices. When the value of these mortgages started to decline, it led to a chain reaction that affected financial institutions globally.

The causes of the 2008 global financial crisis can be attributed to a variety of factors, including:

  1. Subprime Mortgage Lending: Many US banks and mortgage lenders issued subprime mortgages, which were loans to borrowers with a high risk of default. These loans were then packaged into securities and sold to investors, who were unaware of the risk involved.
  2. Complex Financial Instruments: Investment banks created complex financial instruments, such as mortgage-backed securities and collateralized debt obligations, that masked the risk of the underlying assets.
  3. Deregulation: The US government and regulators failed to keep pace with the growth of the financial sector, and allowed many risky practices to go unregulated.
  4. Global Interconnections: The global interconnections of the financial system meant that the crisis in the US housing market quickly spread to financial institutions and economies around the world.

The 2008 global financial crisis had a profound impact on the global economy, leading to high levels of unemployment, a decline in consumer spending, and a reduction in international trade. In response to the crisis, governments around the world implemented stimulus packages and financial reforms to stabilize the economy and prevent similar crises from happening in the future.

2020 COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic led to a stock market crash in 2020, as investors became increasingly concerned about the economic impact of the pandemic. In response to the spread of the virus, governments around the world implemented lockdowns and other measures to slow its spread, which resulted in a sharp decline in consumer spending and widespread business closures.

The stock market reaction was swift and severe, with major stock indices around the world experiencing significant declines. In the US, the Dow Jones Industrial Average saw its largest single-day point drop in history on March 9, 2020, and the S&P 500 saw its largest single-day percentage drop since the 1987 stock market crash.

However, the stock market recovery was also rapid, with central banks and governments implementing unprecedented stimulus measures to support the global economy. The stock market eventually stabilized and began a gradual recovery, but the pandemic continues to impact the world and the global economy, and its long-term effects on the stock market are yet to be seen.

Top 10 Global Stock Exchanges

stock exchange
  1. New York Stock Exchange (NYSE): The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is the largest stock exchange in the world, based on market capitalization. It was founded in 1792 and is located in New York City. The NYSE lists over 2,400 companies. It operates as an auction market, where buyers and sellers trade shares of stock through a network of brokers and dealers. The NYSE is also known for its iconic building located at 11 Wall Street in Manhattan, New York, and its iconic bell, which is rung every day to signal the beginning and end of the trading day.
  2. NASDAQ: The NASDAQ (National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations) is a stock exchange located in New York City and is the second largest stock exchange in the world by market capitalization, after the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). Unlike the NYSE, which is an auction market, the NASDAQ operates as a dealer market, where market makers buy and sell shares of stock electronically. It was founded in 1971 and is known for being the first electronic stock exchange. The NASDAQ lists over 3,000 companies. Some of the biggest technology companies, such as Apple, Amazon, and Facebook, are listed on the NASDAQ.
  3. Shanghai Stock Exchange (SSE): The Shanghai Stock Exchange (SSE) is the largest stock exchange in Mainland China. It was established in 1990 and is located in Shanghai, China. The SSE lists over 1,500 companies. The SSE operates as an auction market, where buyers and sellers trade shares of stock through a network of brokers and dealers. The SSE is one of the two stock exchanges in China, the other being the Shenzhen Stock Exchange. The Chinese stock market is among the largest and fastest-growing in the world, but it still has significant restrictions and limitations for foreign investors.
  4. Euronext: Euronext is a pan-European stock exchange operator, offering a diversified range of financial products and services including cash and derivatives markets. It operates marketplaces in Amsterdam, Brussels, Lisbon, Paris, and London and is the largest stock exchange in Europe. Euronext was formed in 2000 through the merger of the Amsterdam Exchanges, the Brussels Stock Exchange, and the Paris Bourse.
  5. Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE): The Tokyo Stock Exchange (TSE) is the largest stock exchange in Japan and one of the largest in the world, based on market capitalization. It was established in 1878 and is located in Tokyo, Japan. The TSE offers a range of financial products and services, including cash markets for equities, bonds, and exchange-traded funds (ETFs), as well as derivatives markets for stock index futures and options. The TSE is also home to many of Japan’s largest and most well-known companies, making it an important hub for investors in the region.
  6. Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SZSE): The Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SZSE) is a stock exchange located in Shenzhen, China. It was established in 1990 and is one of two stock exchanges in mainland China, the other being the Shanghai Stock Exchange. The SZSE mainly focuses on the trading of stocks of companies based in the Guangdong province and other parts of southern China. It also offers to trade in bonds, funds, and other financial instruments. The SZSE has become one of the largest stock exchanges in Asia, and it plays a significant role in the development of China’s capital markets and its economy as a whole.
  7. Hong Kong Stock Exchange (HKEX): The Hong Kong Stock Exchange (HKEX) is a stock exchange located in Hong Kong, China. It was established in 1891 and is one of the largest and oldest stock exchanges in Asia. The HKEX operates a securities market, a futures market, and an OTC (over-the-counter) market, offering a diverse range of financial products and services, including equities, bonds, exchange-traded funds (ETFs), and derivatives. The HKEX is also an important hub for international investors looking to access the Chinese capital markets, and it has a large number of listed companies from mainland China and other parts of Asia. The exchange’s headquarters are located in the Central district of Hong Kong.
  8. National Stock Exchange (NSE): The National Stock Exchange of India (NSE) is a stock exchange located in Mumbai, India. Established in 1994, it is one of the largest stock exchanges in the world and the largest in India in terms of market capitalization. The NSE operates a fully automated electronic trading platform, offering a wide range of financial products and services including cash markets for equities and debt securities, as well as derivatives markets for index futures and options. The NSE also provides trading, clearing, and settlement services, and is known for its high standards of governance and transparency. The NSE plays a significant role in the development of the Indian capital markets and the growth of the Indian economy.
  9. Saudi Stock Exchange: The Saudi Stock Exchange, also known as the Tadawul, is the only stock exchange in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. It was established in 2007 and is located in Riyadh. The Tadawul is the largest stock exchange in the Arab world and one of the largest in the Middle East in terms of market capitalization. The exchange offers a range of financial products and services, including cash markets for equities and bonds, as well as derivatives markets for index futures and options. The Tadawul is also home to many of the largest and most well-known companies in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, making it an important hub for investors in the region. The exchange’s modern trading infrastructure and regulations have made it an attractive destination for international investors looking to access the Middle Eastern capital markets.
  10. London Stock Exchange (LSE): The London Stock Exchange (LSE) is a stock exchange located in London, United Kingdom. It was established in 1773 and is one of the oldest stock exchanges in the world. The LSE operates cash markets for equities, bonds, and exchange-traded funds (ETFs), as well as a range of other financial products and services. It is one of the largest stock exchanges in Europe and is a major hub for international investors looking to access the European capital markets. The LSE is also home to many of the largest and most well-known companies in the UK and other parts of Europe, making it a significant player in the global financial markets. The exchange’s headquarters are located in Paternoster Square in the City of London.

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